To All the Girls We’ve Loved Before: Miss A

Having been following the K-Pop scene for a long time, we at KStreetManila have seen the rise and fall of many artists. We remember their monumental debuts and hit songs. They were the ones who paved the way for many acts we see today. This is what “To All the Girls We’ve Loved Before” will be all about—a tribute to the iconic girl groups who made K-Pop what it is today.

Independent Women

Miss A is composed of Wang Feifei (Fei), Meng Jia (Jia), Lee Minyoung (Min), and Bae Suji (Suzy). They made their debut on July 1, 2010 with their single “Bad Girl Good Girl.” The song was well-received and has earned the group multiple wins in music shows, becoming the fastest group to win on a music show at that time.

The group released their first studio album, A Class, in 2011, which garnered commercial success. Miss A has become so successful that they were invited to perform their songs in the finale of the 2011 All That Skate, an ice show headlined by Olympic figure skating champion Kim Yuna.

Two studio albums, two single albums, three extended plays, and several awards later, the group took a hiatus after promoting their extended play Colors, with “Only You” as the title track. Jia left the group on May 2016, and Min followed on November 2017. During the hiatus, the remaining members focused on solo activities. On December 27, 2017, JYP officially announced Miss A’s disbandment.

Impact on the K-Pop Scene

Miss A has become well-known for their songs that embody female strength. Their debut single “Bad Girl Good Girl”, in strong hip-hop rhythms, calls out men for their image being projected into women. Meanwhile, “Good-Bye Baby” is about calling out a man for cheating on a woman.

Perhaps Miss A’s most memorable song “I Don’t Need a Man”, which has become one of K-Pop’s girl power anthems. The song balances female strength and femininity, sending a message that a girl can be whatever she wants to be, even without a man by her side.

Miss A has shown versatility in their music throughout the years. Even if they’re not singing about female empowerment, their style and concepts have shown to be unconventional. “Breathe” is inspired by Jamaican reggae and hip hop, “Touch” and “Hush” border on powerful and sexy, and their final single “Only You” is more bubblegum pop synth.

The group has promoted extensively not only in South Korea, but also in China, where they have constantly dominated charts. Miss A has also topped charts in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

#ThankYouMissA

What is your favorite Miss A single or album? Let us know in the comments below!

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